Nature Conservation Grants for At-Risk Bat Populations

Nature conservation grants

A few years ago, bats were literally everywhere. As children played outside, they would fly over them. However, the situation today is much different with a dramatic decrease in bat population all over. Diminishing bat populations are a grave cause for concern, out of 18 bat species in Canada, seven of them are already listed on the at-risk Species At Risk Act (SARA). Some of the biggest concerns to bat population include the increased use of pesticides that cause a dramatic change in insects (bat prey), making it harder for bats to find food. Deforestation, as well as the destruction of breeding cavities, has also given to the destruction of homes traditionally used by bats. Increased cave exploration by humans is making any current bat-habitable caves unliveable for the little creatures. Plus, the white-nose syndrome that is rapidly spreading the tri-coloured, northern long-eared and little brown bat species is wiping out a huge population of the creatures. In view of these factors, nature conservation grants have been established to create awareness about what the decline in bat population means for people. The grants are also pivotal in getting rid of negative myths associated with bats and showing them in a fascinating light. Some grants also work on training people how to create safe summer housing for the bats once they are out of hibernation. Some of the most notable nature conservation grants today include the Go Wild Community Grant, Bat Conservation International, The Nature Conservancy, Nature Conservancy, among others. You can play your role in the fight by installing bat boxes or applying for grants that can help bring your unique bat conservation idea to life.